Tag Archives: Stellar Life Cycle

Stellar Evolution Part 2: Main Sequence Stars

When a protostar’s core reaches 15,000,000 degrees Celsius, nuclear fusion begins in its core. This ignition marks the star’s birth as it becomes a main sequence star.

Stars part 2

Main sequence stars have a ton of variety. They range from cooler red stars to hotly burning blue ones, and their size can range from a fraction of our sun’s mass up to several hundred times as large. The only thing that matters for the main sequence is the presence of hydrogen fusion in the core. Hydrogen fusion takes hydrogen ions and turns them into helium, creating massive amounts of energy in the process. The outwards radiation pressure resists the force of gravity, preventing the star from collapsing any further.

Stars Hydrogen Fusion

But once the core runs out of hydrogen, the star starts to contract again briefly, until a shell of hydrogen around the core becomes hot enough to fuse into helium. When this happens, the radiation pushes the outer layers of the star far out into space, turning the star into a red giant. The core continues to collapse, however, continuing to heat up until it reaches 200,000,000 degrees Celsius. At this point, the helium that now makes up the core begins to fuse into carbon. Eventually, the helium will also run out. When this happens, the outer layers of the star continues to expand and cool down until finally all that is left is a planetary nebula with the remnant of the core at the center. We call this remnant a white dwarf.

Stars Planetary Nebula

You may be surprised to not hear the word “supernova” being thrown around. This is because supernovae only occur in incredibly large stars. For most of the main sequence stars, their deaths will be relatively calm and quiet, going out not with a bang, but with a sigh.

Written By: Scott Yarbrough

 

Stellar Evolution Part 1: Nebulae and Protostars

In the vast emptiness of space, there are floating clouds of gas and dust called nebulae. These clouds are stellar nurseries, filled with material that will one day become multiple solar systems. stellar evolution When part of a nebula is slightly more densely packed than the rest, gravity is stronger in that region. It begins to pull the surrounding gas inwards. This increases gravity, which pulls even more stuff in. As this happens, the gas molecules rub against one another, heating up due to friction. When the gas heats up, it begins to give off light, illuminating the nebula with brilliant colors. Eventually, this region of the cloud takes on a rough spherical shape. The gas begins to ionize, separating electrons from their nuclei as the sphere heats up even further as it continues to collapse due to the massive gravitational forces at play. This spherical shape is known as a protostar! Stellar Evolution Stars This protostar will continue to collapse and heat up, eventually becoming a main-sequence star. For that to happen, nuclear fusion must begin in the core. When it starts, outwards radiation pressure is so strong that it prevents gravity from causing the star to collapse any further. We’ll talk about the life — and death — of main-sequence star in a future blog post, so keep your eyes open! Written By: Scott Yarbrough

The Life and Death of Stars

Did you know that stars live and die just like other living things?…Okay, maybe not just like them. But they do have a beginning, middle, and end. All stars start out the same way, from a nebula. A nebula, otherwise known as a “star nursery”, is a cloud of gas and dust out in space. Nebulae will then start to clump up due to the massive amounts of gravitational pull. This clumping creates protostars, which are basically spherical masses of the gas and dust that are collecting even more gas and dust from the nebula.

stars 5

Once the gravity of the protostars becomes great enough, the process of fusion will begin, turning the protostar into a star. A star is defined to be a self-luminous gaseous spheroidal celestial body of great mass which produces energy by means of nuclear fusion reactions. Fusion is the act of turning lighter elements into heavier ones which can only occur under great pressures.

Depending on the original mass of the nebula and protostar, a star can be of any number of sizes. For our purposes, let’s stick with an average sized star (like our Sun),  a massive star, and a supermassive star.

stars 4

stars 3

For a Sun-like star, once it has completed fusing hydrogen into helium it will become unstable and swell in size, becoming a red giant. As a red giant, it will have a thin outer shell of some hydrogen gas, and an inner core of mostly helium. Once the helium runs out, it will become extremely unstable and puff out it’s shells of hydrogen and helium, becoming a planetary nebula. One example of this is the Ring Nebula (M57). Left in the center is a white dwarf star, which is named so due to how hot and luminous it is. When the white dwarf radiates its energy away, it will fade, becoming a brown (or black) dwarf star.

stars 1

stars

For a massive and supermassive star: they will go through the fusion process, become unstable, puff out a shell, swell to a red supergiant, start the next round of fusion, and so on and so forth, creating heavier and heavier elements. Once the massive and supermassive star become extremely unstable they will go supernova. A supernova is the largest explosion in space, which is very bright and ejects most of its mass.

stars 6When this happens for a massive star, a neutron star will be left behind. A neutron star is a celestial object with very small radius (typically 18 miles/30 km) and very high density, composed mostly of closely packed neutrons. Neutron stars also tend to rotate extremely quickly and emit regular pulses of radio waves and other electromagnetic radiation, earning them another name, pulsars.For a supermassive star, it will follow the same path of a massive star, but with one key difference. Instead of leaving a neutron star behind after the supernova, it will leave behind a black hole. A black hole is simply a region of space having a gravitational field so intense that no matter or radiation can escape.

Supernovae create the heaviest elements in our universe, which are the building blocks to life as we know it. Without this constant cycle of creation and destruction, we would have nothing. So the next time you look up in the sky, be thankful to that glowing orb of incandescent gas and all of the gas and dust that came before it.

WELCOME TO OUR ASTROCAMP BLOG

We would like to thank you for visiting our blog. AstroCamp is a hands-on physical science program with an emphasis on astronomy and space exploration. Our classes and activities are designed to inspire students toward future success in their academic and personal pursuits. This blog is intended to provide you with up-to-date news and information about our camp programs, as well as current science and astronomical happenings. This blog has been created by our staff who have at least a Bachelors Degree in Physics or Astronomy, however it is not uncommon for them to have a Masters Degree or PhD. We encourage you to also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Twitter, and Vine to see even more of our interesting science, space and astronomy information. Feel free to leave comments, questions, or share our blog with others. Please visit www.astrocampschool.org for additional information. Happy Reading!

Categories

Archives

Tags